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CSDP Participating States

The CSDP currently has 30 states out of 37 plus FCT as participating states. Click below to see a list of participating states, or locate your preferred state on the hyperlink enabled map to visit the website of a participating state.

CSDP Participating States

Click on the hyperlink map below for more information on our participating states.

abia adamawa akwaibom anambra bauchi bayelsa benue borno crossriver ebonyi edo ekiti enugu gombe imo katsina kebbi kogi kwara kwara nassarawa niger ogun ondo osun oyo plateau taraba yobe zamfara

Governor Inuwa Yahaya of Gombe State Commisionned CSDP projects

Governor Inuwa Yahaya of Gombe State Commisionned CSDP projects

Governor Inuwa Yahaya of Gombe State have Commisionned Jekadafari Health Care Centre at Gombe Local Government

Governor Inuwa yahaya, Deputy Govenor, other dignitories during commissioning of Jekadafari Health care Centre

Author: GOMBE CSDP
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Construction of Skill acquisition centre for Women group

Construction of Skill acquisition centre for Women group

Construction of Skill acquisition centre for Women group 

Author: GOMBE CSDP
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Construction of Skill acquisition centre for Vulnerable group

Construction of Skill acquisition centre for Vulnerable group

Construction of Skill acquisition centre for Vulnerable group 

Author: GOMBE CSDP
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Construction a Block of 2 Classrooms, Office, Store and Furniture

Construction a Block of 2 Classrooms, Office, Store and Furniture

Construction a Block of 2 Classrooms, Office, Store and Furniture at Barwo Community in Nafada Local Government Area, to minimize travelling long distance to have quality education. The Gombe State Agency for Community and Social Development Projects contributed the sum of N 4,158,945.00 while the community contributed the sum of N 462,105.00 and the total cost of the project is N 4,621,050.00.The community has also promised to provide a sound atmosphere as a sign of goodwill and community support for the project.

Author: GOMBE CSDP
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Construction of Examination Hall

Construction of Examination Hall

The student in Burak Community has to travel more than 11 kilometres to write their final examination due to lack of examination

Author: GOMBE CSDP
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Latest Projects

CSDP Concludes Environmental and Social SafeGuard Training (ESSG)

CSDP Concludes Environmental and Social SafeGuard Training (ESSG) 20 April 2020

CSDP Concludes Environmental and Social SafeGuard Training (ESSG)

To build the capacity of staff on environmental and social safeguards

The Federal Project Support Unit (FPSU) of the Community and Social Development Project (CSDP) carried out a workshop to build the capacity of staff on environmental and social safeguards. The workshop was carried out between 16th and 21st of March, 2020 and the participants were divided into 2 batches

FPSU Switches to Fiber Optics

FPSU Switches to Fiber Optics 12 May 2020

FPSU Switches to Fiber Optics

Another Giant Stride by the National Coordinator

The National Coordinator of CSDP, Dr. Abdulkarim Obaje, in his bid to face the new technology realities posed by the Novel COVID-19 Pandemic, has initiated a Fiber Optics Internet in the entire Federal Project Support Unit of CSDP, which now gives a clear and fast internet connection sufficient for hosting Virtual Meetings, live Webinars, online Monitoring and Evaluation and even Interviews.

CSDP in Readiness as COVID 19 initiates Community Transmission

CSDP in Readiness as COVID 19 initiates Community Transmission 16 May 2020

CSDP in Readiness as COVID 19 initiates Community Transmission

State Agencies trained in various Mitigation and Preparedness Procedures

Towards the race against time, to prevent the ongoing COVID 19 Pandemic from making its was into the Vulnerable communities, CSDP has strategized on how best to tackle the Psychosocial component of Disaster Management at the Poor and Vulnerable level in the Communities.

CSDP PARTNERS NAPTIP on Psychosocial Assistance

CSDP PARTNERS NAPTIP on Psychosocial Assistance 17 May 2020

CSDP PARTNERS NAPTIP on Psychosocial Assistance

Deployment of helplines in the state agencies to provide psychosocial support on COVID-19 and other crisis

The Community and Social Development Project (CSDP) is partnering with the National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons (NAPTIP) to provide technical assistance on psychosocial support at community level.

CSDP Ahead of the Curve in Fighting COVID-19

CSDP Ahead of the Curve in Fighting COVID-19 29 May 2020

CSDP Ahead of the Curve in Fighting COVID-19

The aim is to reduce the pandemic’s life span in Nigeria. BY SULEIMAN ODAPU

At times of emergencies, national assets are mobilized to be part of collective struggle to tackle various crises, this President Muhammadu Buhari knows very well, thus his call for the mobilization of National assets to contain the novel Corona Virus or COVID -19 was loud. At the drop of the hat, the National Coordinator of Community and Social Development Project (CSDP), Dr Abdulkarim Obaje swung into action. He mobilized the CSDP human and material resources for this national assignment with tripartite impact; local, national, and global. The aim is to reduce the pandemic’s life span in Nigeria

CSDP host Online WebEx Meeting for the Draft CDD Policy Review

CSDP host Online WebEx Meeting for the Draft CDD Policy Review 1 June 2020

CSDP host Online WebEx Meeting for the Draft CDD Policy Review

Promoting Community Driven Development approach in Nigeria

Due to the lockdown, a virtual meeting has just been concluded as regards the Draft Community Driven Development (CDD) Policy Review Document. 
The meeting was held at about 12:30pm on the 1st of June, 2020

World Bank Post COVID-19 Intervention Grant: AKSG Inaugurates Committee

World Bank Post COVID-19 Intervention Grant: AKSG Inaugurates Committee 9 June 2020

World Bank Post COVID-19 Intervention Grant: AKSG Inaugurates Committee

Akwa Ibom State COVID-19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus Programme (State CARES)

Akwa Ibom State COVID-19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus Programme (State CARES) for Nigeria COVID-19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus Programme (NIGERIA CARES) has been inaugurated.

Inaugurating the Committee, the Chairman of COVID-19 Management Committee and Secretary to the State Government, Dr Emmanuel Ekuwem, said the Committee is expected to work out modalities that will enable the State benefit from the World Bank's  Post COVID-19 intervention programmes  as directed by the National Economic Council. 

Nasarawa CSDA applauds communities for patronage

Nasarawa CSDA applauds communities for patronage 9 June 2020

Nasarawa CSDA applauds communities for patronage

The Nasarawa State Community and Social Development Agency has commended Communities in the World Bank captured Local Government Councils for their patronage in the last 10 Years.

The Nasarawa State Community and Social Development Agency has commended Communities in the World Bank captured Local Government Councils for their patronage in the last 10 Years.

General Manager of the Agency, Ahmed Saidu Ishaq gave the commendation during an interview, shortly after declaring open a one day sensitization workshop for LGAs, LGARCS (MDAs) Desk Officers on Monday at De Crown Hotel Lafia, the State Capital.

Head of Operations of CSDP in Nassarawa State on a Fiduciary Resolution Visit

Head of Operations of CSDP in Nassarawa State on a Fiduciary Resolution Visit 9 June 2020

Head of Operations of CSDP in Nassarawa State on a Fiduciary Resolution Visit

FPSU Verification team lead by CSDP Head of Operations Mr. Adewale Fabowale, Head of Admin, Mrs. Gadzama Fati and Projects Finance Officer, Mrs. Zubair Ramat

Nassarawa State Community and State Development Agency (CSDA), General Manager Ahmed  Saidu Ey-Shaa received the Head of Operations and his team from the Federal Project Support Unit, the headquaters of CSDP, the Head of Operations   Mr. Adewale Fabowale, followed by the Head of Admin, Mrs. Gadzama Fati and Projects Finance Officer, Mrs. Zubair Ramat  met with the Staff of the NSCSDA.

Other staff of NSCSDA on hand to receive the team from the Headquaters were Operation Manager, Hajiya Maimuna Usman, Finance and Admin Manager, Abdullahi O. Yahaya and Monitory and Evaluation Manager, Dr. Dahiru M. Kabiru during the briefing.

Gombe Govt provides N600m for community projects

Gombe Govt provides N600m for community projects 10 June 2020

Gombe Govt provides N600m for community projects

To implement 256 micro projects of critical needs.

The Gombe State Government has provided N600 million to communities and groups in the state to implement 256 micro projects of critical needs.

Alhaji Abubakar Kumo, General Manager of the Gombe State Agency for Community and Social Development (GMCSDA), disclosed this in an interview with newsmen in Gombe on Wednesday.

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Gombe CSDA Events

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GM Kogi CSDA Lectures Students on Chemistry as Aseni Community Break Jinxs

GM Kogi CSDA Lectures Students on Chemistry as Aseni Community Break Jinxs

Community Lauds Gov. Bello on Rural Development

Apr 5, 2021 136 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

The Governor of Kogi State, Alhaji Yahaya Bello has been urged to continue the World Bank partnership for the provision of social infrastructures in the rural areas.

This was made known by the people of Aseni Community in Kogi local government area of Kogi state through the Chief of the community, HRH, Alhaji Muhammed Yakubu, the Ona of Aseni during a pre-commissioning field monitoring visit by the General Manager of the Kogi State Community and Social Development Agency, Mallam Dauda O. Momoh.

The Ona of Aseni lauded the State Government for sponsoring the Renovation of one number classroom in the secondary school in the community and the provision of water through the construction of a motorized deep well. He lamented the lack of water in the community as the major problem the community was faced with as the borehole water in the community contains high level of ferrous.

The Ona was quoted as saying “potable water was our major problem in this area before the Kogi State Community and Social Development Agency’s intervention. The intervention did not come easy, we drilled seven borehole pits before this breakthrough, this is because our land here is a loosed one and the only location that is firm underground contains ferreous which is dangerous for drinking. It even makes our cloth reddish when it is used for washing.

The field monitoring visit by the General Manager of the Kogi State Community and Social Development Agency, Mallam Dauda O. Momoh was part of the arrangements for project commissioning across the twenty-one Local Government Areas of Kogi state. The General Manager was visibly happy by the resilience of the community in ensuring successful completion of the project. He took time to lecture the students of the community secondary school in chemistry.

He lectured them on the naming of some chemical compounds using the IUPAC naming format. He also promised that the Agency would look into the new request of the community which is the provision of improved facilities in the Secondary school and also the provision of more sources of water. Aseni community is one of the six communities that benefited from the Agency’s intervention in 2019/2020.

In a chat with the cross section of the community, he told them of the State Governor’s approval for the state to participate in the COVID-19 ACTION RECOVERY AND ECONOMIC STIMULUS (NG-CARES) PROGRAMME. The GM added that under the Result Area 1 of the intervention, the programme is aimed at supporting the scaling up of existing safety net interventions at the state level.

The NG-CARES safety net interventions to be supported by the PforR will expand the coverage of social transfers; Labour Intensive Public Works (LIPW) opportunities in the social sectors; livelihood grants; and social service infrastructure microprojects he said.
 

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WORLD WATER DAY 2021: CSDP Unlocking Access to Clean Water in Nigeria

CSDP has assisted rural poor communities with 4,562 water micro projects in terms of solar powered boreholes, hand pump boreholes, water reticulation systems and water conservation points. - Dr. Obaje

Mar 25, 2021 241 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

March 22 every year is observed as the World Water day. And this year 2021 was no different despite the presence of COVID 19.  It is a day set aside by the United Nations, (UN) to focus attention on water by inviting stake- holders; governments, NGOs, corporate bodies, and individuals to create awareness on the need for safe water. The UN resolution 64/292 recognized water as a human right and key to the realization of all human rights. Indeed, Water is life!


The World Bank says over 663 million people globally are still without improved drinking water sources. While the UN  2019 Water Report sadly stated that one in every three persons in the world lacks access to safe water and majority of these are in the developing countries. Inadequate access to safe water has health implications especially water borne diseases and reduces productivity. In the olden days, water attracted settlements, lack of it now is causing crisis. With scarce sources of water, there are now new migration away from dry places
No wonder, President Muhammadu Buhari in agreeing to the fundamental need for safe water, declared a “state of emergency in water supply” in 2018 and since then government has stepped up in its efforts at increased access to safe water. 

 

In Nigeria, one silent yet salient effort of government at provision of safe water in rural communities is bringing smiles to rural dwellers who hitherto had more access to soft drinks than to safe water. Today, these communities have safe water through assistance from the World Bank supported Community and Social Development Project (CSDP) which is active in 30 states of the federation and the FCT. The project coordinated by the Federal Project Support Unit and jointly financed by the World Bank, Federal, FCT and state Governments have made tremendous strides in assisting rural poor communities with access to clean water. 
 

According to the National Coordinator of CSDP, Dr. Abdulkarim Obaje, the CSDP has assisted rural poor communities with 4,562 water micro projects in terms of solar powered boreholes, hand pump boreholes, water reticulation systems and water conservation points.    
 

The theme of the 2021 world water day is “Valuing Water”. Water means different thing to different people, yet the saying “Water is Life” is uniquely and unanimously agreed globally.  This is evident in the implementation of the CSDP which gives the people the power to choose what they want in a development model named CDD.  
 

There is no better time to value water than now. It is essential in fighting COVID 19 pandemic.  The World Health Organization says washing of hands is key in pushing COVID 19 far away from us. That safe water reduces many health challenges like Cholera, Diarrhea, and typhoid.  Provision of safe water is not the exclusive of government. NGOs and other non-state actors and individuals can assist in the provision of clean water. Importantly too, individuals with access to clean water must maintain it by always closing the tap to avoid wastage. 
 

Any five-hundred-naira investment in clean water, an average of One Thousand, Five Hundred Naira is gained in saved medical cost and therefore increased productivity. In fact, a study by Hutton et al 2015, puts it that in rural areas, it is even higher as three thousand five hundred naira is returned in saved medical costs for every N500 investment in clean water. 
 

An Intermediate Outcome Evaluation study for the CSDP in 2020, revealed that because of CSDP intervention, there is a reduction of average distance to water source from 3 kilometers to about 600 metres while the average time spent for fetching water has reduced from 53 minutes to less than 12 minutes, these no doubt has increased productivity in these communities. There is also reduction in cost of water. 
 

The message from world leaders and scientists on the 2021 World Water Day, is that the world needs more clean water, the good news for us is that the Nigeria COVID 19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus (NG-CARES) programme Result Area 1, supports the provision of safe water. So, by the time the two years emergency NG-CARES ends, more people in Nigeria would have had increased access to safe water.  

Suleiman Odapu
Information and Communication Officer
CSDP,
ibnodapu@gmail.com  

 

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7th Year Anniversary of Gov Obiano of Anambra State

7th Year Anniversary of Gov Obiano of Anambra State

Focus on Social Protection

Mar 20, 2021 169 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

In a bid to provide access to improved economic and social infrastructure to select communities in hard to reach arears, the Governor of Anambra State resuscitated and strengthened the Anambra State Community and Social Development Agency (ANCSDA) which was established in 2009 by an Act of the Anambra State House of Assembly but could not take-off until August 1, 2018. 

Modelled alongside the highly acclaimed the public infrastructure programme, Community Choose Your Project Initiative but with specific attention to communities identified under the State Poverty Mapping, the Obiano administration  funded ANCSDA alongside the World Bank under the Assisted Community and Social Development Project - Additional Financing (CSDP-AF), to start community project implementation in March 2019.
 
To date, the footprints of the ANCSDA collaboration is dotted across twelve focal Local Government Areas. These include; Anambra East, Anambra-West, Ayamelum, Awka-North, Orumba-North, Orumba South, Ogbaru, Dunukofia, Ihiala, Idemmili-North, Oyi, and Anaocha LGAs. 

Propelled by the  project development objective (PDO) to increase access to improved social and natural resources infrastructure in a sustainable manner throughout Nigeria by the poor; ANCSDA adopted Community Driven Development (CDD), designed to empower the selected communities by giving them resources and authority to use them responsibly. The communities plan, part finance, implement, monitor and maintain sustainable and socially inclusive multi-sectoral micro projects.
 
The project areas in key sectors include; education, health, water resources, rural transportation, rural electrification, environment, socio-economic etc. Special efforts are also being made to mainstream gender and target vulnerable members of the rural communities in the project implementation.
 
To date , a total of 62 communities, 17 vulnerable groups and well over two million beneficiaries have been empowered with access to improved social and natural resource infrastructure. About 249 micro projects were supported with over a thousand temporal jobs, direct and indirect, created. Trainings were offered the youths in various skills acquisition like carpentry, tailoring, phone repairs, bead making, hair dressing, etc., with a proviso to step it down on return to their different communities. 

Aside project implementation and pro-poor interventions, the agency approved fifty-eight Community Development Plans and seventeen Group Development Plans for adoption in the state integrated development plan. Other critical interventions  by ANCSDA are in the area of social responsibility and psycho-social support to care-seekers and victims of various kinds of trauma, including gender-based violence, domestic violence, rape, sexual abuse, herdsmen attack among others by the agency's trained staff. The agency equally played pivotal role in sensitization of many communities on the  observation Covid-19 protocols at the height of the pandemic. 

The agency has within a short span achieved  remarkable improvement in infrastructural development in the focal communities where its efforts were directed. The Amanuke Feeder Road and Culvert, the Ndiukwuenu Science Lab, Okpeze Rural Rlectrification, Ezi Anam VIP Toilet, Enugwu Aguleri Civic Centre, Nkpunando Health Centre, Umuzu Community Secondary School, Igbakwu Community Secondary School, Onneh Water Borehole, etc., were some of the projects implemented by the agency which will continue to speak to the hearts of the beneficiary communities. 

Led by a management team and staff headed by a General Manager/CEO. Mr. Chudi Mojekwu and supervised by a Board of Directors, Chaired by HRH Igwe Rowland Odegbo, through the ANCSDA, 
Anambra State is already consolidating and institutionalizing government community and social programmes and  drastically reducing poverty of infrastructural development in most rural communities, especially those considered to be particularly in need. Without doubt the concept of comprehensive development as envisaged by the Obiano government is yielding desired results.

 

By Emeka Ozumba and Ejike Anyaduba 

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FPSU HOLDS WORKSHOP ON TEAM BUIDLING

FPSU HOLDS WORKSHOP ON TEAM BUIDLING

Building Strong, Winning and Sustaining Working Team

Jan 12, 2021 330 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

A three-day workshop on NG CARES Building Strong, winning and Sustaining Working Team has ended in Nasarawa State with a call on staff of the Federal Project Support Unit, FPSU to take team building seriously in their daily activities to improve productivity.
National Coordinator of CSDP, Dr. Abdulkarim Obaje stated this at the closing of the workshop which was facilitated by CEES Assist Resources. The workshop was attended by management and staff of the FPSU.
Obaje expressed the readiness of the CSDP to carry out the implementation of the NG CARES, saying that capacity of staff at the FPSU and State Agencies of the CSDP has been improved for the task ahead. He charged CSDP staff double their efforts at this die minute of the CSDP closure. 
The workshop had Modules on Overview of NG CARES Performance for Result, Performance Tracking, Implementation and M&E. Labour Intensive Public Works, Result Focused Cash Transfer and Social Safety Nets Sustainability, Agricultural Value Chain Development, Building High Performance Team and Gender Sensitivity in Project Management. Other Modules are Change Resistance, Supportive Supervision, 
CSDP which closes on 30 April 2021 is among the few World Bank assisted projects designated to implement the Nigeria COVID 19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus (NG CARES) 

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Monitoring COVID-19 Impact on Nigerian Households

Monitoring COVID-19 Impact on Nigerian Households

Alleviating the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis is vital for preventing poverty from deepening and increasing in Nigeria

Nov 22, 2020 637 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

Nigeria was among the first countries in Sub-Saharan Africa to identify COVID-19 (coronavirus) cases and has since implemented strict measures to contain the spread of the virus. At the same time, oil prices plummeted by 60% following the spread of the global pandemic. As the oil sector accounts for the bulk of Nigerian government revenue, this collapse in prices has profound implications for the economy.

The federal government is confronted with the simultaneous challenge of combatting the public health crisis of the pandemic alongside trying to bolster a weakening economy. Given the mounting evidence that the social and economic impacts of these twin crises are likely to be significant, the government is ramping up policy interventions that can help mitigate such negative impacts. Alleviating the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis is vital for preventing poverty from deepening and increasing in Nigeria; before the crisis, approximately 4 in 10 Nigerians were living below the national poverty line, and millions more were living just above the poverty line, making them vulnerable to falling back into poverty when shocks occur.

To provide the government with timely evidence to guide the policy response, a new high-frequency survey – the Nigeria COVID-19 National Longitudinal Phone Survey (COVID-19 NLPS) – has been initiated in Nigeria. This survey is being implemented by the National Bureau of Statistics with technical support from the World Bank and is designed to measure and monitor the economic and social impacts of the COVID-19 crisis by tracking households’ welfare and behavior every month over a period of 12 months. The survey has a panel structure, such that it follows a representative sample of Nigerian households to assess how key indicators that may underpin the overall policy response are changing over time.

Household COVID-19 monitoring survey

The COVID-19 NLPS collects a wide range of information from households across Nigeria. The sample, which is nationally representative and covers both urban and rural areas, was drawn from the 2018/19 General Household Survey Panel (GHS-Panel), so vital background information on each household was already available.

The survey covers important topics including knowledge and concerns about the pandemic, access to food and other basic needs, employment and income loss, and safety nets and coping strategies. Its design is flexible, such that the topics covered can be altered according to evolving needs, priorities, and insights from emerging data. The survey is implemented using the Survey Solutions software for Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing, this allows for faster access to the data and dissemination of results.    

Household Survey Results


Methodology

 

 

 

Household Survey Results and Documentation 

Round 1 - May 2020

Round 2 - June 2020

Round 3 - July 2020

Round 4 - August 2020

 

Methodology


Data for phone monitoring surveys

Contacts

Gbemisola (Mimi) Oseni
Senior Economist
goseni@worldbank.org

Tara Vishwanath
Lead Economist
tvishwanath@worldbank.org

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Impact of COVID-19 on households: What do phone surveys tell us?

Impact of COVID-19 on households: What do phone surveys tell us?

The extensive country coverage of the phone surveys opens up opportunities to view the impacts of COVID-19 on people and firms with a wider lens

Nov 22, 2020 594 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

As COVID-19(coronavirus) has spread across the world, the World Bank has projected extreme poverty to increase for the first time since the Asian crisis in 1998, putting at risk the global goal of reducing extreme poverty to 3% of the world’s population by 2030. The duration and scale of impacts are highly uncertain and expected to vary widely within and across countries and over time, which makes it really important to closely monitor the impacts of the crisis on households and firms for designing policy responses. The World Bank’s high-frequency monitoring phone surveys, which are going on in nearly 100 countries, have sought to fill the information gap that traditional in-person surveys are ill-suited to fill during a pandemic. They are a window into how the pandemic is affecting every aspect of the lives of almost every household in the developing world. A similar initiative of Business Pulse Surveys adds to this picture by tracking the pandemic’s impacts on firms in 51 countries.

The extensive country coverage of the phone surveys opens up opportunities to view the impacts of COVID-19 on people and firms with a wider lens , which has not been available before at this scale. With some adjustments, the data from different countries can be compared, combined, grouped, and analyzed together to make comparisons between countries, find patterns across different types of countries, and examine policy impacts. The COVID-19 High Frequency Survey Global Dashboard released last week is an important step in making the harmonized indicators available to all, even as we continue to add more countries, surveys, and indicators, including those from Business Pulse Surveys.   

Widespread impacts on several dimensions of well-being

NURHI increases demand for family planning in Nigerian citiesThe early insights from the harmonized household data from 40 countries, which account for nearly one-fifth of the world’s population, yield a picture that is alarmingly consistent with the severe welfare impacts we had projected using past data. While we cannot directly estimate poverty (since detailed data on consumption cannot be collected from phone respondents), the simple questions we ask about job and income losses provide an overall sense of changes in well-being. On average, 36% of those working in a country prior to COVID19 stopped working during April-July, and 62% of households reported reduction in total income.  Large-scale job and income losses are broadly consistent with the impacts on firms reported by Business Pulse Surveys.

Households’ losses were not limited to labor earnings. More than 60% of households receiving remittances in an average country before the pandemic reported a drop in remittances they received. This seems to confirm the fears that international and domestic remittances, which act as a key source of income for many in the developing world, particularly in rural areas, are now frayed by job losses in the (urban) services sector, where migrant workers tend to be employed in large numbers.

Households achieve some degree of resilience by adopting a variety of coping strategies. Reducing consumption is the most common, followed by drawing down emergency savings; selling assets like property is less frequent but not negligible, reported by an average of 8% of households. For the vulnerable, these strategies can have serious consequences for future incomes, resilience to other shocks, and nutrition. On average, 16% of households report at least one adult going without food for a full day in the last week before the survey. We do not know how much of the food insecurity is linked to pre-existing conditions or non-COVID shocks. But COVID is at least partly to blame – in almost all countries, food insecurity is reported more frequently among households where job losses after COVID were reported (figure 1).

COVID19

The burden of impacts is higher in poor countries, and on certain groups within countries

As one would expect, there is wide variation across countries in these household-level impacts.  The lower the per capita GDP of a country, the more likely are households to report partial or no payment of wages and an adult going without food for a day in the previous week. Estimates from a recent Bank paper combining phone survey data with data from pre-COVID surveys in four countries in Sub-Saharan Africa illustrate the scale of income impacts in low-income countries. In these four countries alone, 256 million individuals (77% of the population) are estimated to live in households that have lost income due to the pandemic.

Disruptions to education are also much more severe in poorer countries (figure 2), as school closures and the lack of access to digital services make it much less likely for children to complete a teacher-provided assignment. In the long-term, lost months of learning, nutritional deficiencies, and difficulty in accessing health care (reported in some countries) can affect inequality of opportunity, social mobility and productivity. That these risks are much higher in low-income countries, which are home to most of the world’s extreme poor, should be a cause for worry.

Some of the patterns emerging from the phone surveys are broadly consistent with our earlier projections about the “new poor.” Those with lower levels of education are far more likely to lose their jobs than college-educated workers in almost all countries.  Jobs were lost at higher rates in the industry and services sectors than in agriculture. But even so, job losses and food insecurity in rural areas are on a similar scale as in urban areas, which suggests that the impacts have permeated throughout the economy including rural areas, even though urban areas are likely to have taken the most direct and immediate hit. Early numbers hint at wide gender disparities. Among the respondents to our surveys (who may not necessarily represent women in a country), women were more likely to lose their jobs than men in all but two of the countries.

Are direct assistance programs reaching those who need help?

The harmonized data allows us to get a snapshot of the coverage of social assistance programs, which have been expanded significantly in many countries. Our general conclusion: Given the magnitude of impacts, public social assistance interventions in the early months of the pandemic were highly inadequate in most countries.  On average across countries, 20% of households reported receiving assistance, with the number ranging from nearly 70% in Indonesia and Mongolia to less than 10% in countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. In most countries, social assistance does not appear to be well-targeted to those who are affected by the crisis (food-insecure or job losses) or vulnerable before it struck (e.g. those with lower education). Average coverage is much lower for IDA countries than non-IDA countries, which could reflect, at least to some extent, pre-existing differences in the coverage of safety net programs.

These findings are not surprising, given the challenges of expanding programs rapidly and in ways that reach both the existing and the new poor in countries with limited capacity and resources. The (eventual) coverage of these programs may also tick up much higher, since the first wave of surveys may have been conducted too soon after the onset of the crisis to be able to detect the effects of expansions in social assistance in many countries.

Are things improving?

On this critical question, we don’t yet have the coverage of data to form a definitive view. However, in the 15 countries for which we have harmonized data for two waves of surveys, we do see fledgling signs of improvement, particularly in food security. There has also been a small but significant increase in the share of households receiving social assistance in these countries.

In many respects, the early findings from the harmonized phone survey data conform to expectations: widespread impacts that amplify pre-existing inequalities between rich and poor countries and between haves and have-nots within countries. Even as economies rebuild gradually, the focus of policymakers and the development community must remain on the vulnerable countries and households , who will find recovery to be harder and slower. In future blogs, we will have more to say on what the uneven distribution of impacts might mean for the longer-term outlook on poverty reduction and inequality.

 

 

Authors

Carolina Sánchez-Páramo

Carolina Sánchez-Páramo

World Bank Group Global Director, Poverty

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آمبر نارايان

Ambar Narayan

Lead Economist, Poverty Global Practice, World Bank

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How COVID-19 will impact our cities in the long term

How COVID-19 will impact our cities in the long term

Written by Abha Joshi-Ghani, Director for Knowledge and Learning, World Bank

Nov 22, 2020 594 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

With less commuting and clearer skies, the COVID-19 pandemic is an opportunity to rethink our cities. National governments need to work together with city administrations and people to form good policies. Cities are engines of growth: they create jobs, alleviate poverty, and are key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. This is particularly important for developing countries, which are urbanizing at a much faster pace compared to developed countries.

History shows us that cities have also dealt well with past pandemics and epidemics, from the Great Plague, to cholera, Ebola, and SARS, when they are managed and governed well.

The impact of the present global crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic is still evolving and is multi-dimensional, combining health, economic and social crisis. The urban poor have been hit the hardest. The fault lines of inequity and poverty have been vividly exposed and have deepened with the economic impact of the pandemic.

The World Bank estimates that some 100 million people have been pushed back into poverty, wiping out much of the gains of the last few years. Cities in developing countries, with some 1 billion people living in dense and overcrowded informal settlements, with poor access to basic services, have been hit the hardest.

Before the current pandemic, some 25-30 people migrated to Indian cities every minute. The pandemic has triggered a reverse migration back to rural areas with economic shutdowns, job losses and lack of livelihoods for migrants. Knowledge workers are also migrating away from cities, looking for open spaces. The future of cities has become uncertain and constrained by diminishing revenues due to the economic downturn and already limited infrastructure services.

However, time and again cities have proved to be resilient and have emerged stronger, showing they can build back better and improve the lives of city dwellers. Seoul, South Korea, controlled the spread of Covid-19 through rigorous contact tracing, widespread testing and mandatory isolation. This was possible due to the existing foundations of transparency, accountability and solidarity which allowed the city to use mobile phone data, CCTV coverage and credit card data to track infected persons. The city demonstrated accountability and transparency by sharing information and appropriate solutions.

City-wide stakeholder consultations with the community, run by the national government and city institutions, created a relationship of trust and solidarity. Stakeholder participation is crucial for sustainable and inclusive growth, increasing accountability. Community participation is at the heart of good policy-making and the provision of inclusive public services. There are many other examples from developing and emerging economies that have used good governance and social commitment to slow down the pace of spread of the pandemic.


Strengthening governance to address the infrastructure gap in developing and emerging countries

Image: Draft White Paper, 2019, The World Bank

Strengthening governance to address the infrastructure gap in developing and emerging countries
City leadership, smart citizens, feedback loops, strategic planning, transparency, strong institutions, and a culture of integrity are the key pillars of good governance. Robust city planning and management depend on these. Vertical and horizontal co-ordination across all levels of government are critical. They enable city governments to tailor an efficient response, develop a relationship of trust with communities and consult multiple stakeholders as they device their policies and plan for action.

Cities which have emerged stronger after a crisis are those that have demonstrated good governance, were ready to embrace change and were agile, innovative and creative in their response: provided social safety nets, boosted service delivery, created community trust and encouraged community involvement. Good governance has emerged as one of the key drivers of successful responses from cities. Those cites which have invested in building strong institutions and training people have been able to respond better.

The biggest opportunity for cities from this pandemic is to build back better with the planned fiscal stimulus: more climate resilient infrastructure, green initiatives such as increasing public spaces, creating vehicle free streets, making bike lanes, refurbishing buildings to multiple uses and thereby doing more with less. This cannot be done by the public sector alone. Cities will need to attract private sector and social partners to close the financing gap. Good governance is an imperative to attract private financing and to work with the private sector.

Good governance goes hand in hand with digitization. Cities which have embraced digitalization and e-governance are able to respond better to the crisis. They are using digital services and big data to help track community spread, closely involving stake holders such as civil society, citizens and the private sector. Cities across Latin America and Africa are using digital platforms to deliver cash transfers to the poor to keep vulnerable populations afloat. Big data is also being used in a number of developing country cities, such as Cairo and Kinshasa, to map and assess COVID hot spots among the population so that early response efforts can be targeted.

Healthier cities are within reach, as is evident from the impact of COVID-19 on the decline in commuting, with alternative transport like walking or cycling gaining in popularity. Cities are already experiencing better air quality and clearer skies due to less traffic and are incentivized to take actions to keep their emissions down.

For example, plans are underway to expand the Greater Cairo subway to accommodate 6 million passengers by 2025. Big data is helping Bogota and many other cities assess the increased demand for bike lanes to accommodate the number of cyclists in the city taking shorter journeys due to the pandemic.

The COVID-19 crisis presents cities with the opportunity for a 'Great Reset' towards greener, resilient, healthier, inclusive and sustainable cities. We cannot afford to squander away this opportunity. City leadership, robust governance and civil trust are the biggest drivers of city resilience and revival. Cities cannot respond to a crisis of this magnitude and convert it into an opportunity without these key drivers.

The gap in public services in cities is a governance gap. The success of cities as resilient places that serve their citizens in an inclusive and sustainable manner is anchored in the principles of good governance. It is not too late for cities to work towards this goal.


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The Anambra State COVID-19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus (A-CARES) program have been Inaugurated in Anambra State.

The Anambra State COVID-19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus (A-CARES) program have been Inaugurated in Anambra State.

A short-term response to the economic crisis affecting states in Nigeria due to the COVID 19 Pandemic

Nov 19, 2020 698 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

The Anambra State COVID-19 Action Recovery and Economic Stimulus (A-CARES) program have been Inaugurated in Anambra State. The A-CARES program which was Inaugurated on November 17, 2020 at a ceremony in Awka was presided over by the Chairman of Anambra State Steering Committee of the A-CARES, Hon. Mark Okoye, the Honourable Commissioner for Economic Planning, Budget and Development Partners.


CARES being a World Bank Assisted program, is a short-term response to the economic crisis affecting states in Nigeria. It is designed to support budgeted government interventions at the state level- targeting existing, and newly vulnerable /poor households, agricultural value chains, and micro and small enterprises (MSEs) affected by the economic crisis.
 

To ensure that implementation of the Anambra CARES is in line with the state's development plan, a Steering Committee made up of robust Heads of key MDAs were carefully selected by the governor, HE, Chief Willie Maduaburochukwu Obiano, particularly due to the important role the MDAs plays in the recovery of the state economy.
 

Members of Anambra State Steering Committee of the CARES programme are:
- Hon. Commissioner of Economic Planning, Budget and Development Partners.  - Chairman
- Hon. Commissioner of Justice
- Hon. Commissioner of Women, Children and Social Welfare
- Hon. Commissioner of Agriculture and Rural Development
- Hon. Commissioner of Industry, Trade and Commerce
- Hon. Commissioner Local Government and Chieftaincy Matters
- Hon. Commissioner Environment
- Hon. Commissioner of Lands
- Hon. Commissioner of Information
- Permanent Secretary, Ministry of EBDP
- Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Finance
- General Manager, Anambra CSDA
- Project Coordinator, FADAMA
- Managing Director/CEO, State Cash Transfer Unit (SCTU)
- State Coordination Unit  -- Secretariat

 

 

 

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Governor Inuwa Yahaya of Gombe State Commisionned CSDP projects

Governor Inuwa Yahaya of Gombe State Commisionned CSDP projects

Governor Inuwa Yahaya of Gombe State have Commisionned Jekadafari Health Care Centre at Gombe Local Government

Nov 17, 2020 237 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

The Governor, Deputy Govenor, and other dignitories during commissioning of Jekadafari Health care Centre supported by Gombe State Agency for Community and Social Development project in Gombe Local Government. The Governor commissioned the project along side the motorized borehole supported by Hopes Sprins International NGOs.

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Inauguration Ceremony of the Federal Cares Steering and Technical Committees

Speech by the Honorable Minister of Finance, Budget and National Planning, Hajiya Zainab Ahmed at the inauguration of the Federal N-CARES Steering and Technical Committee (Photo Album Included)

Nov 13, 2020 942 Views 0 Comments FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

It is my pleasure to be with you at the auspicious occasion of the inauguration of the Federal Steering Committee and Federal Technical Committee of the Nigeria Covid-19 Action Recovery for Economic Stimulus (N-CARES).

2.     I want to start by appreciating the visionary leadership of our dear President, Muhammed Buhari GCFR in following up with his promise of ensuring that 100 million Nigerians are lifted out of poverty within 10 years. It is on the premise of this agenda of Mr. President that we are here today.

 

3.     The diverse and severe impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to be felt across the world with significant consequences on informal businesses, and households that survive on daily income and the peasant farmers who depend on their farm produce to survive. This key population make up over 60% of our entire population in Nigeria therefore, the need to cushion the effects of the pandemic on the vulnerable sectors through the provision of palliatives and stimulus package.


4.    Distinguished Ladies and Gentlemen, the Federal Government has created several windows of interventions as captured in the Economic Sustainability Plan (ESP) inaugurated by Mr. President, Muhammad Buhari GCFR, on March 30, 2020 to among other things respond robustly and appropriately to the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, identify fiscal measures to enhance oil and non-oil government revenues and reduce non-essential spending.


5.    As part of windows of opportunity to mitigate the effect of Covid-19, the Federal Government is in the process of accessing a World Bank loan of $750 million on behalf of the states to stimulate the local economy and support vulnerable household’s consumption.


6.    To ensure that implementation of the N-CARES is in line with the Federal Government Priorities as outlined in the Economic Sustainability Plan, the Federal Steering Committee made up of Ministers and Permanent Secretaries as well as a Technical Committee made up of Directors of key MDAs has to be in place. The Government has carefully selected you as members of the Federal Steering and Technical Committees because of the important role your MDAs plays in the recovery of the Nigerian economy as well as the fulfillment of lifting 100 million people out of poverty; and I have no doubt you can deliver. 


7.    Distinguished Ladies and Gentlemen, the inauguration of your committee is expedient given the nature of this emergency intervention; Nigeria as the biggest economy in Africa cannot afford to remain in recession; the survival of over 200 million population is germane to all we do and we must address the concerns of the majority of our populace. Let me remind you that the consequences will be too high if we ignore the root cause of rising civil unrest in our country. We must therefore, fashion out ways of ensuring that post Covid-19 is not injurious to the Nigerian people and the economy.


8.    Ladies and Gentlemen, as members of the Federal Steering Committee your major role will be to provide an overall policy direction for the implementation of this programme and advise the President appropriately. While, the Federal Technical Committee will be responsible for the programme oversight, overall guidance, support, coordination, Strategic direction, review and approval of the annual work programme as well as budget for the Federal CARES Support Unit (FCSU).


9.    Against this backdrop, my task here today is to inaugurate you so that we can hit the ground running to ensure that the directives of Mr. President are achieved within the set timelines.

 

INAUGURATION OF THE FEDERAL STEERING AND TECHNICAL COMMITTEES
10.    Let me inform this forum of the members of the Steering Committee of the Nigeria CARES Programme:
Hon. Minister of State (BNP) FMFBNP- Chairman, 
HMS-Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (FMARD)
HMS-Federal Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment (FMITI)
HMS-Federal Ministry of Labour and Employment (FMLE)
HMS-Federal Ministry of Environment (FMEnv)
HMS-Federal Ministry of Education (FME)  
Permanent Secretary, Budget & National Planning (BNP)
Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Finance (BNP)
Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Humanitarian Affairs (MHDMSD)
Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Water Resources (FMWR)
Executive Director NGF Secretariat
Chairman Federal CARES Technical Team (FMFBNP) – Secretariat

 

TERMS OF REFERENCE (ToR) FOR THE FEDERAL STEERING COMMITTEE
11.    Dear colleagues, permit me also to read out the Terms of Reference for your guidance in your assignments; your committee shall: 
Provide overall strategic and policy guidance for the implementation of the programme;
Reviewing Operation performance annually and provide feedback to government at both federal and state levels and;
Garnering support for the operation as further specified in the Operations manual. 

 

12.    I also want to inform this forum of the members of the Federal Technical Committee to rise and be inaugurated:
         Director Economic Growth (BNP) FMFBNP - Chairman
         Director-Federal Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development (FMARD)
         Director-Federal Ministry of Water Resources (FMWR)
         Director-Federal Ministry of Industry Trade and Investment (FMITI)
         Director-Ministry of Humanitarian, Disaster Management & Soc. Dev. (MHDMSD)
         Director-Federal Ministry of Education (FME)
         Director-Federal Ministry of Environment (FMEnv)
         Director-Federal Ministry of Women Affairs (FMWA)
         Director-Federal Ministry of Labour and Employment (FMLE)
         Director-International Economic Relation Department (IERD) FMFBNP
         Director-Nigeria Bureau of Statistics (NBS)
         Director-Nigerian Governors Forum (NGF) Secretariat
         Assistant Director-Economic Growth Department (BNP) FMFBNP
         Federal CARES Support Unit - Secretariat

 

TERMS OF REFERENCE (ToR) FOR THE FEDERAL TECHNICAL COMMITTEE
13.    While standing, let me also reiterate your Terms of Reference as follows:
Providing technical oversight and guidance for program operation implementation;
Reviewing and approving annual work program and budget for the FCSU;
Reviewing project operation performance, accounting and audit reports and ensuring implementation of decisions taken by the FCSC;
Conducting performance review of key FCSU staff;
Garnering support for National CDD policy;
Undertaking Advocacy and Sensitization of the Nigeria CARES programme to Nigerian; and
Approving amendments to the Operations manual and the overall Programme Implementation Plan for the operations as further specified in the Operation manual.

 

14.    DECLARATION: I hereby formally inaugurate the Federal CARES Steering Committee and Federal CARES Technical Committee respectively.
 

15.    I look forward to the effective implementation of the programme. I therefore, encourage you to deploy your wealth of experiences and expertise to ensure the successful takeoff and implementation of the N-CARES programme.
 

16.    I wish you success in this very important assignment.
 

17.    Thank you.

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